Heavy Metal

The runners are contacted through their fixer and he asks them to meet him personally at the Alabaster Maiden for 7 PM.  He says he was contacted directly by the client, but for reasons that will be evident when they arrive, they could not conduct the meeting themselves.

The Alabaster Maiden is a pretty busy place.  Chosen for its level of magical security, it is seen as both a good runner bar, as well as a mage hang out.  Astrally projecting mages all chat with one another as well as the occasional spirit, as the team makes their way to a back room for the meeting.  Their fixer is there and waits for everyone to arrive before getting started.  The back room is warded and soundproofed, so the runners can avoid astral eavesdroppers.

“Well the reason I’ve called you all here is that a man within the Mitsuhama office tower in the downtown core has called in his own extraction.  He says he’s a security specialist of sorts and is tired of the tight leash his parent company keeps on him.  Apparently he never leaves the building, so you’ll have to go in and get him.  He also said to go in during his shift, as retrieving him out side of his patrol hours would be ‘problematic’.  For helping him get away from Mitsuhama, he’s offering you 5,000¥ apiece.

Likely the runners will see this as a paltry sum and go to negotiate.  The fixer has been authorized to haggle but can’t increase the amount too much.

If the runners take the job, the fixer will tell them the target’s shifts (4PM – 11:30PM with an hour off after and then again from 12:30AM – 8AM) and that the man goes by Shi (Japanese for 4).

What isn’t known is that Shi is a cyborg with the mental development of a child and has severe Arithmomania (obsessive counting).  Extracting a hulking machine that has to count every new thing he sees will not be easy.

Legwork on this man should be confusing.  There are a few runners that run with a simple number as their call sign, but none are known to have corporate ties.  Trying to obtain blueprints for the building will prove impossible, as Mitsuhama purchased the blueprints from the construction company and have them sealed away in a data vault (they could try and track down the data vault and raid it for the blueprints).  There are no records of anyone going by Shi in Mitsuhama’s personnel database (he’s listed under Resources).

The Mitsuhama tower is 40 stories tall, comprised primarily of offices, but there are basement levels and some executive development labs in the upper reaches of the tower.  Shi is protecting the upper offices the day the runners go in.  On top of the usual security measures (guards, cameras, drones, spirits), they employ a lot of automated systems that run independantly of the security grid on the grounds.  Shi is also one of four cyborgs employed on the premises (Ichi, Ni, San, Shi).  While the correct one will be friendly, the other three will be hostile.

The grounds are an open field once you’re past the outer wall (which is littered with Mitsuhama advertisment AROs and Mitsuhama-sponsored events at nearby convention sites).  The small parking lot beside the building is visitor parking, while employee parking is underground.

Core Infrastructure:

Elevators are one-man capsules that sense employee passcodes as well as measure the occupant.  If the code is valid, but the weight is wrong (within a certain tolerance), the capsule seals the person inside until security can investigate.

Stairs are actually chutes that will quickly get people to the ground level in case of evacuation.  The surface is slick and imposes a climbing penalty of -3 dice to try and climb up.

Lower Lobby

1 – Security Checkpoint.  Despite the wide open, glassed-in enclosure, this entrance serves as the only accessway into the building.  The glass is bulletproof and consists of two lineups:  a guest entrance and a citizen entrance.  Those with registered commcodes can walk through the employee entrance with minimal fuss (still going through a chemical and cyberware scanner), while guests have to wait in line to be issued a temporary passcode that resides on their commlink.  A credentials check is done and checking their public ID (commlinks must be Active at all times) before stepping through the scanners.

2 – Atrium.  This massive two-storey atrium features large rice paper tapestries with hand-painted kanji with Mitsuhama’s mission statement, as well as large water features that cascade down the tall pillars that reach up toward the skylight.  Holographic billboards dot the atrium, amongst assorted plants and bustling visitors.  Despite its grand size, the atrium is busy with activity.

3 – Koi Gardens.  Two temple like buildings sit on opposite sides of the atrium, complete with pond, wooden bridge and large koi fish.  These temples are actually security offices that house Matrix operations and at least one mage.  Anyone viewing the busy ARO of the building might notice birds flitting around the atrium and roosting at the temples.  These are automated agents that retrieve security data from various nodes around the atrium and deliver it to the operations building.  Pedestrian traffic here is allowed, so gaining access to the building without being noticed would be tricky.

4 – Public Relations.  Media types, inquiring citizens or anyone wanting to learn about Mitsuhama’s business practices can come here for the latest spin doctoring and corporate BS.

5 – Human Resources.  Want a job with Mitsuhama?  Here’s where you need to go.  The room is crammed with desks where you can initiate the first job interview and with offices in the back for second interviews if you pass the screening test.

6 – Information.  This desk is dual purpose:  visitors can come here to learn more about the company, get a map to the adjoined mall or book one of the meeting rooms.  Going to the elevators requires you to walk through a security checkpoint and undergo a thorough check and passcode validation.  A series of scanners will check them for contraband and if all checks clear, they will be assigned an elevator shaft to go up to the next level.

7 – Personal Visitor Elevators.  These capsules are one-man elevators that whisk visitors up to the upper lobby.  Only the registered passcodes will open the capsule door.

8 – Mall.  With all the convenience one could want, you can walk into the mall and buy any consumer goods Mitsuhama or its subsidiaries manufacture.  The lower levels sell the common goods with the upper floor being for the more expensive or more specialized items.

9 – Conference Rooms.  These rooms offer local businessmen a place to have a small conference (max 20 people per room) with associates under the protection of Mitsuhama security.  These rooms can also be booked by employees and the inner doors only open with a registered citizen’s passcode.

10 – Employee Lounge.  Just off of the Employee Elevators is a lounge with the latest in personal entertainment, as well as private booths where employees can rest, read or meditate.  All doors are locked without a correct passcode.

11 – Checkpoint.  Security has to check that anyone entering through the outer doors or the parking garage is a valid visitor.  A small number of guards sit here ready to respond should an employee elevator lock down.

12 – Mall Escalators.  A double-wide escalator to allow easy travel between floors in the mall.

13 – Stairs.  For those who don’t like the capsule elevators, the old staircase is there to provide manual access to the various floors.

Upper Lobby

1 – Terrace Restaurant.  A gourmet restaurant with great reviews.  Getting a seat without a reservation is impossible, but if you have the cred and the reservation, the Japanese cuisine is authentic and in many cases, exotic (possibly illegal in some countries).  This restaurant is almost always packed to capacity.

2 – Atrium.  This massive two-storey atrium features large rice paper tapestries with hand-painted kanji with Mitsuhama’s mission statement, as well as large water features that cascade down the tall pillars that reach up toward the skylight.  The upper level railing looks down over the atrium floor below.

3 – Food Court.  Different fast food and buffet style restaurants carve themselves into this space, leaving room for a band of seating at its center.  Visitors and employees alike mingle here to get a bite to eat.

4 – Boutiques.  Some of Mitsuhama’s subsidiaries weren’t large enough to justify a full store in the mall, so there are assorted kiosks here selling everything from jewelry to commlinks, from ARO Clothing to software.

5 – Conference Rooms.  These rooms offer local businessmen a place to have a small conference (max 20 people per room) with associates under the protection of Mitsuhama security.  These rooms can also be booked by employees and the inner doors only open with a registered citizen’s passcode.

6 – Employee Lounge.  Just off of the Employee Elevators is a lounge with the latest in personal entertainment, as well as private booths where employees can rest, read or meditate.  All doors are locked without a correct passcode.

7 – Personal Visitor Elevators.  These capsules are one-man elevators that whisk visitors up to the upper lobby.  Only the registered passcodes will open the capsule door.

8 – Mall.  With all the convenience one could want, you can walk into the mall and buy any consumer goods Mitsuhama or its subsidiaries manufacture.  The lower levels sell the common goods with the upper floor being for the more expensive or more specialized items.

9 – Checkpoint.  Security has to check that anyone entering through the outer doors is a valid visitor.  A small number of guards sit here ready to respond should an employee elevator lock down.

10 – Mall Escalators.  A double-wide escalator to allow easy travel between floors in the mall.

11 – Stairs.  For those who don’t like the capsule elevators, the old staircase is there to provide manual access to the various floors.

Parking Levels

1 – Security Check.  Vehicles are checked coming in and leaving.  Only employees are allowed in the parking garage, so non-employee passengers will be directed to the main entrance.  The cars are checked on the way out to ensure the same number of passengers as when it entered and it undergoes a weight check to ensure it is the same weight as per when it entered.  The garage itself is patrolled by drones, in case someone slips by a human patrol.

Middle Floors (3-12)

1-8, 11, 12, 16, 17 – Cube Farms.  Crammed together to almost claustrophobic proportions, these cubicles are little more than rows of desks, filing cabinets and chairs.  These wage slaves are watched over by a “floor boss” to ensure no one slacks off on company time.

9, 15 – Meeting Rooms.  Places for departments or different branches to put ideas together on the various projects being conducted at any given time.  The room is dominated by a large rectangular table with a holo-projector in the center.

10 – Function Room.  The room is designed to fill any number of roles.  In the case of employee birthdays, it can be used to hold small celebrations.  It has a pair of fridges that can hold employee snacks.  It has a small sectioned off space for visiting executives to use as temporary office space, if needed.  It can also be used as a meeting area for large meetings, should the other rooms already be booked.

Middle Floors (13-24)

1-3, 6, 7, 9, 11, 12 – Manager Offices.  Middle managers who get to delegate projects to those floor boss on the lower levels set up shop in these mid range offices.  They are spartanly furnished and almost no personal effects to them, giving them a sterile feel.

5, 8, 10 – Meeting Rooms.  Places for project managers to discuss future improvements to products and develop blueprints for new hardware in a 3 dimensional holographic environment.

15 – Simulation Processing.  Equipped with the latest in AR technology any new specification can be 3-D modeled in as close to 1:1 scale as possible and simulated to find obvious design issues.  The room is draped in holographic projectors and only has a handful of chairs dotting the meeting area.

Upper Floors (25-36)

1-3 – Development Manager Offices.  The chief lab geeks camp out in here.  Unlike the other offices throughout the building, these are a cluttered mess of hardware and half-assembled projects.  The desk’s surface is covered in technical documentation and spare parts.

5, 8 – Prototype Assembly.  This is where the digital models from the lower levels become actual items.  These rooms are equipped for both the development of hardware, as well as any software (sectioned off area for servers).  To vent any noxious fumes, or for workers to try and catch a brief glimpse of the sun, each lab has a grassy garden they can escape to (also serves as a recharge spot for solar powered gadgets).

6, 7 – Drafting Labs.  Looking a bit like a cube farm, this area is more wide open and is scattered with blueprints, technical manuals and partial constructed units that have been causing problems.

Unmarked – Storage Rooms for extra components.

The hallways are stark white with only the room number (in Japanese) over each door, so you know which office the door leads into.  The upper floors all work on differing projects at any point.  The cyborg security robots are on guard duty on floors with projects of high importance.  Shi is on the 33rd floor, set into an alcove in the wall.

When the team encounters Shi, he will ask if they are there for him.  If they say yes (they’d better), he will eagerly bounce like a young boy and follow the runners, chattering endlessly (until he encounters something he has to count).  The one obstacle the team will face is that Shi’s armaments are programmed to not fire at Mitsuhama employees, so he can’t help out in firefights (unless a runner hacks his system and disables the safety).  Even if the guts are re-worked, he still has friendships with these people and won’t want to gun down his friends.  If the runners are too violent, he may decide he no longer wants to come with them.  The escape should be tricky, since a silent alarm will trigger the moment Shi leaves his designated patrol area and security will investigate

If the runners get out of the compound, Shi will become very distracted by the outside world, but if they can get his attention, he will direct them to an alleyway, seemingly in the middle of nowhere for the drop point and pay them the agreed upon sum.

>> So, some corporate lackey needs to be broken out of a state-of-the-art MCT facility and he’s only offering a paltry sum?  Count me out.
>> Burn

>> How about doing something for the betterment of a person’s life?  Certainly a little good karma counts for something…
>> Diva

>> If I can’t use it to pay the bills or eat, it ain’t worth shit.
>> Burn

>> Who said anything about extracting a person?
>> Tek

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~ by 1nsomniac on July 7, 2010.

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